Food Quotes


"No therapy or drug known to modern medical science can rebuild tissue that has been damaged by disease or trauma. Food alone can accomplish this feat. It is for this reason that nutrition is an indispensable weapon against disease".
Dr. Bernard Jensen (1908-2001)




Sunday, July 27, 2008

Chili Steak Tacos

One 2 lb. beef round steak
lard (not hydrogenated) or bacon drippings (from bacon with no nitrites or nitrates)
2 t. chili powder
1 t. ground cumin
filtered water, as needed

corn tortillas
coconut oil
shredded cabbage
guacamole
real sour cream
salsa
sliced green onions
cilantro

Directions: Slice beef thinly - no more than 1/4-inch. Heat a skillet and add lard or bacon drippings. Brown beef strips. Do not boil off liquid. Add chili powder and cumin and stir to combine. There sould be a sufficient amount of liqud on beef. If not add 1 c. filtered water to pan. Put lid on skillet and let cook for several hours, checking occasionally to make sure there is plenty of liquid in pan. After beef is done, heat another skillet and add coconut oil. Cook tortillas in hot oil till they are completely heated through. Fold in half. Place several spoonfuls of beef in each tortilla. Top with the rest of the ingredients.


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Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Sprouted Crust Pizza

1 Alvarado Sprouted Pizza Bread (crust)
1 jar Trader Joe's Organic Spaghetti Sauce with Mushrooms (fat free)
3 T. extra-virgin, expeller-pressed olive oil
cheese, grated (whatever variety you like of real cheese)
other toppings of your choice such as pepperoni, bacon, ham or salami (no nitrites or nitrates in any of these), black olives, thinly sliced onions, pepperoncinis (sliced), sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil (drained), Italian sausage, minced garlic, pineapple, mushrooms (sliced), red or green bell pepper (sliced)
more cheese, grated

Directions: Preheat oven to broil. Lay pizza crust on a baking sheet. Drizzle olive oil on pizza crust. Spread sauce over top (as much as you like). Sprinkle a generous amount of cheese over sauce. Lay the other toppings on and then sprinkle more cheese over to top. Put the baking on a lower rack in oven to allow the toppings to bake before the cheese gets bubbly. Remove from oven when cheese is nicely browned.


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Monday, July 21, 2008

Franziska - Chapter Two

When we left Franziska she had become a recipient of God’s goodness. She was a teenager when God saved her. Having been born into a Catholic family, she now faced new challenges. Because she was a serious disciple of Christ, her grandparents, with whom she’d enjoyed a close relationship, now disinherited her, giving her portion of their wealth to the Catholic church.

In her adolescence, she had already experienced the cost of following Christ. Because she had tasted of His rich mercies and grace she was willing to give up family relationships and temporal comforts. Earthly riches paled in comparison to God’s love for her. Difficult as it must have been, she accepted her grandparent’s severe judgment rather than deny her Lord the right to rule her heart. She knew the power of the risen Lord which enabled her to commit to this heartbreak. She also knew the empowering of the Spirit of God who was working in her both to will and to do His good pleasure. I wonder, did she sing Be Thou My Vision because she certainly lived it:

Riches I heed not, nor man’s empty praise,
Thou mine inheritance, now and always;
Thou and Thou only, first in my heart;
High King of Heaven, my treasure, Thou art.

When Franziska was 20 years old, she married a man named Hermann Gustave Meyer. There were 2 ceremonies, the first of which the state required, performed by a state official. But in another ceremony on May 29th, 1882, shortly after the state ceremony, Hermann and Franziska recited their vows again to their pastor in the presence of their church family and loved ones. This was done because of their desire to honor the Lord in their marriage – making Him central from the onset. They considered May 29th their wedding anniversary.

For awhile the couple lived with Hermann’s mother, Anna, and cared for her before she died. Then because they wanted to spare their children the cruelties of German life with its wars, the couple immigrated to the U.S. in 1886 with their only surviving child, Helmuth, who was 3 years old. Two other children, both girls, Hedwig, age one, and Hermine aged two, died shortly before Franziska and Hermann left for America.

The story behind their daughter’s deaths is mysterious. It seems that as the couple was preparing to leave for America, a woman with whom they were acquainted, having no children of her own, approached Hermann and Franziska asking that they give their daughters over to her rather than take them on the arduous trip. They, of course, refused. The woman, at that point, angrily predicted that the girls would never make the trip, that they would, in fact, die before the Meyers departed.

How this unkind prediction became reality is not known. The details were not recorded or verbally passed down to subsequent generations. But it certainly makes one wonder if the angry woman had a part in the sad outcome. It is not known. What is obvious, however, is that the enemy of Franziska's soul was certainly at work trying to instill unfounded fears in her. But overall, God was working out His sovereign plan for her and her husband.

Though she was no stranger to calamity, Franziska now desperately needed to cling to the truth that God was still good and even this circumstance was wrought out of His love for her. “Though He slay me,” Job said in his affliction, “yet will I trust Him.” Though she undoubtedly struggled, Franziska ultimately consented to God’s sovereign hand molding her, remembering His goodness displayed to her through Christ’s sufferings for her. We know she submitted because of her lifelong testimony of love for her Savior. Bitterness was not a part of her life.

Regardless of this sad turn of events, the Meyers did leave for America as scheduled on a passenger ship called the S.S. Donau in the summer of 1886. Of course they traveled in steerage, the lower-most part of the ship, like most other immigrants. The trip itself was grueling and long. Steerage offered no fresh air and the atmosphere was heavy with darkness, dampness and foul odors. Along with all of the other immigrants, the Meyers slept in narrow bunks stacked three high. Food was served in one enormous kettle from which each family portioned out their share into a bucket. From this common bucket the family ate. There were not even simple amenities such as tables or bathing facilities. Chamber pots served as the "indoor toilets" and of course added to the stench of the crowded hold. For weeks this was the lot of Hermann and Franziska and their little three year old boy, Helmuth, as the ship tossed and turned over storm-impacted waters.

With all this unpleasantness I am sure dry land - any dry land - would have been perceived as blessed relief. But what really awaited them in America? They believed they were destined to arrive in a land of promise and opportunity, but the facts will reveal quite a different scene. The information from which they derived their plan, which was to homestead in Nebraska, was flawed. Land developers in the U.S., at that time, were advertising extensively, even in Germany, praising Nebraska as a wonderland, although Americans knew it as the “Great American Dessert”. Because of these glowing reports, by the time the Meyer’s disembarked the ship in the U.S., they were determined to settle there. So upon their arrival in Baltimore, after a bit of a respite, they began making arrangements to move on to Nebraska to homestead.

Chapter three will unfold the story of Franziska and Hermann's American advernture.

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Friday, July 18, 2008

Ground Beef Shepherd's Pie

1 tablespoon expeller-expressed, extra-virgin olive oil
1 onion, chopped
1 pound ground beef (grass-fed and raised without hormones or antibiotics)
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 cup green beans
1 cup tomatoes, diced
2 potatoes, cooked and mashed
1 egg, beaten
1/2 cup filtered water
1/4 cup shredded Cheddar cheese

Directions: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degree C). Coat a 2-quart casserole dish with cooking spray. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook onion in oil for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Stir in the ground beef and basil, and cook and stir for 5 more minutes. Mix in the garlic, green beans, and tomatoes, and simmer for 5 minutes. Transfer beef mixture to prepared dish. In a mixing bowl, mix together the mashed potatoes, egg, and water. Spread evenly over meat mixture. Bake in a preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until potatoes start to brown on top. Sprinkle with cheese, and continue cooking for 5 minutes.
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Monday, July 14, 2008

Tart and Sweet Coleslaw

3 T. expeller-expressed, extra-virgin olive oil
2 T. organic apricot or peach fruit-only type spread
2 T. organic unpasteurized cider vinegar (with "mother" type such as Bragg's)
1 T. organic ketchup
1 t. dry mustard
1/2 t. real sea salt or Redmond Real salt
3 c. shredded cabbage
1 c. shredded carrots
2 green onions, thinly sliced

Directions: In a large bowl combine dressing ingredients: oil, fruit spread, vinegar, ketchup, mustard, salt and pepper. Add cabbage, carrots and green onion and toss to coat. Makes 4 servings.
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Sunday, July 13, 2008

Sesame Chopped Salad

Salad:
1 small head cabbage, shredded
1/4 head iceberg lettuce, shredded
1/2 lb. fresh bean sprouts
1 c. jicama, cut julienne style
1 c. toasted slivered almonds
1 recipe Asian Salad Dressing (see recipe below)

Directions: In a large bowl, combine cabbage, lettuce, bean sprouts, jicama and almonds. Drizzle dressing (see recipe below) over salad and toss to combine. Makes 6 servings.

Sesame and Ginger Dressing:
1/4 c. soy sauce
1/4 c. white wine vinegar
3 T. pure organic maple syrup
1 T. organic peanut butter (peanuts and salt only kind)
1 T. grated fresh ginger
1/2 t. dried coriander, crushed
1/4 c. expeller-expressed safflower oil
1/4 c. toasted sesame oil (expeller-expressed)

Directions: In a bowl combine all ingredients except safflower oil. Whisk to combine. Slowly drizzle in oils, whisking until thickened.

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Saturday, July 12, 2008

Romaine and Apple Salad

1/2 c. freshly squeezed lemon juice
1/4 c. expeller-expressed, extra-virgin olive oil
2 T. balsamic vinegar
1 t. real sea salt or Redmond Real salt
1/2 t. freshly ground black pepper
2 heads Romaine lettuce, outer ragged leaves removed, ends trimmed and cut crosswise into 1-inch slices
1/4 lb. Gruyere cheese, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 green apple, sliced thin
1 large avocado, peeled, seeded and sliced
1/4 c. dried cranberries
Directions: For vinaigrette, whisk together lemon juice, olive oil, vinegar, salt and pepper. Refrigerate till ready to use. In a large bowl combine romaine, cheese, apple, avocado and cranberries. Drizzle vinaigrette over salad; toss to combine. Makes 4 servings.
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Thursday, July 10, 2008

Beautiful Breakfast!

Nourishing Smoothies

A comment from Anne referring to the Baked Oat Breakfast Pudding:

"Oh, that sounds so yummy! I must admit that I'm a breakfast-skipper. I usually resort to cereal by my 10am break because I'm blacking out. Okay, Sharon, I'm going to turn over a new leaf and start making us good breakfasts. I really can't wait to hear about the smoothies!"

Today's breakfast topic is...you guessed it...smoothies. But before that, I want to remind you of my breakfast plan. Here it is once again:

1. Baked Oat Breakfast Pudding
2. An Omelet or Frittata (or occasionally a quiche) of some kind with bacon or sausage
3. A Smoothie of some kind
4. Yogurt with fruit, coconut, nuts and pure organic maple syrup (this is the only fixed menu item - always on Sundays)
5. Waffles, French toast or pancakes with bacon or sausage
6. Breakfast Flan with bacon or sausage
7. Bacon (or sausage) with eggs and sometimes country potatoes

The recipe for the smoothie includes two raw eggs per person. (You will be surprised when you taste it, that you can in no way detect the raw eggs.) Now we hear so much hype about the dangers of raw eggs. But we need not fear salmonella as long as we have our trusty spray bottles of full-strength white vinegar and full-strength 3% hydrogen peroxide. These two used together are more effective than phenol, the industry standard.

Since the salmonella bacteria can only exist on the outer shell of the egg, a spray of both vinegar and hydrogen peroxide on the egg shell will kill any of those nasty little bugs present there. The inside of a fresh egg is always sterile. But the truth of the matter is that only one in 30,000 eggs is contaminated and if you use good eggs from humane sources the percentage drops drastically. Another safeguard is the coconut oil in the smoothie. Coconut oil is antibacterial (pathogenic bacteria). It will kill any pathogens in the mix (not that I think there would be any, but perhaps once in a lifetime it could happen).

This smoothie will keep you satisfied all morning. The recipe for the Cinnamon-Berry Smoothie is been posted on the right sidebar. In fact, it is the first recipe listed there. So enjoy!
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Tuesday, July 8, 2008

Beautiful Breakfast! - Omelets, Frittatas and Quiches

Omelets, Frittatas and Quiches

Breakfast really is the most important meal of the day - a good breakfast that is. We eat a substantial breakfast every morning as you can see. And we do not gain weight. What we do gain from these wonderful meals is a satisfied tummy. Both my husband and I remain satiated till well past 1 PM. We do not snack nor even have the have the desire to.

All your eating throughout the day depends upon how you eat in the morning. If you have a breakfast of carbs (or none at all), you will get hungry before lunch and find yourself snacking. Most likely that snacking will be poor quality food, which supplies little or no nutrition, but plenty of calories and usually bad fat along with a host of other toxic ingredients. Thus a breakfast of carbs does not meet your body's needs and actually ends up causing weight gain, even though it is probably low-fat. And you will continue to feel hungry.

Your first meal of the day should include a healthy dose of good fat, adequate protein and some healthy carbs - preferably a fruit that is high in antioxidants and low in calories, such as blueberries, blackberries, raspberries or strawberries. The fat satiates your hunger, enables the carbs and protein to be absorbed more evenly and slowly and gives you lots of energy. With a breakfast like this, you will be able to function unstressed with a clear head and quiet tummy.

My Dad always used to tell his daughters, "Eat a good breakfast. The health of your future children depends upon it." Most every morning we had eggs. I remained healthy as long as I ate that way at home before school. When I got into college, I began to eat on the fly. Skipping breakfast most mornings, I would eat an orange once I got to school. It wasn't long before I started getting colds.

I'll never forget, as a college student, the first time I ever had a sore throat. It was after I had stopped eating breakfast at home. My throat hurt so bad. I really had never felt anything like it. At the time I couldn't figure out why all of a sudden I kept getting colds and painful throats. Now I know why. My Dad was right. The health of my future children would be affected because my health was affected by what I ate or did not eat in the morning hours.

Here again is my breakfast plan:

1. Baked Oat Breakfast Pudding
2. An omelet or frittata (or occasionally a quiche) of some kind with bacon or sausage
3. A smoothie of some kind
4. Yogurt with fruit, coconut, nuts and pure organic maple syrup (this is the only fixed menu item - always on Sundays)
5. Waffles, French toast or pancakes with bacon or sausage
6. Breakfast Flan with bacon or sausage
7. Bacon (or sausage) with eggs and sometimes country potatoes

Omelet: Omelets are easy and quick to make. I do not follow a recipe specifically. I use 2 eggs per person (just myself and Robert), whisked together with a little filtered water (2 T. for four eggs). Then I:
1. Saute whatever veggies (about 2 cups) I have on hand in bacon drippings (after having cooked the bacon), butter or coconut oil. That might be mushrooms, bell peppers, onion, squash or broccoli, etc.
2. Remove the veggies, clean the pan; place back on medium-high heat; add a little coconut oil or bacon drippings to the pan after it is hot and then add the eggs.
3. Move the eggs to the center of the pan from the edges as they set.
4. Lay on the veggies when the eggs are almost done (on half of the omelet), sprinkle on an herb (fresh or dried) such as basil or cilantro and spread grated cheese on top of the veggies and herbs.
5. Fold half the omelet over onto the half that has the veggies and cheese on it.
6. Remove from the pan onto two plates. We might use toppings such as: sour cream or salsa, etc.

Frittata: A frittata is simply an unfolded omelet run under the broiler. Many times I start out to make an omelet only to find that when I go to fold it, it sticks to the bottom of the pan and is very difficult to turn. When that happens, I redistribute the veggies and cheese so it covers the entire top of the omelet. Then I put the pan under the broiler (I cook in cast iron skillets) until the cheese is bubbly and the egg is puffy. When you take it from the oven, cut it in pie-shaped slices. Though it stuck before it went under the broiler, you will find that it now releases from the pan with absolutely no difficulty.

Quiche: Once in a while I will make a quiche. Quiches are more work than either omelets or frittatas. There are several quiche recipes here on my blog. Click on the Recipe Index on the top navigation bar and look under Main Dishes.

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Beautiful Breakfast!

Baked Oat Breakfast Pudding
Mondays posts have been, when I have managed, my weekly menu plans for the evening meal. I have never posted breakfasts or lunches, though I prepare each of those on a daily basis. I do not plan breakfast menus specifically. Rather, I find that we eat the same things on a weekly basis and within those regular servings, there is room for variety.

Over the next few days I will give recipes and explain my breakfast plan. Today's breakfast topic will be Baked Oat Breakfast Pudding.

First, however, is a list of what I prepare throughout the week for breakfasts:

1. Baked Oat Breakfast Pudding
2. An omelet or frittata (or occasionally a quiche) of some kind with bacon or sausage
3. A smoothie of some kind
4. Yogurt with fruit, coconut, nuts and pure organic maple syrup (this is the only fixed menu item - always on Sundays)
5. Waffles, French toast or pancakes with bacon or sausage
6. Breakfast Flan and bacon or sausage
7. Bacon (or sausage) with eggs and sometimes country potatoes

Baked Oat Breakfast Pudding: This is so delicious - such a treat. I'll never go back to plain oatmeal in a bowl. I especially like it because it contains eggs, which are the best breakfast food there is. Once a month I make baked oatmeal. The recipe makes a lot. We eat it hot with cream and a little pure organic maple syrup. Then when it is cool, I cut what is left over (about 10 more servings) into serving-size squares and package the squares in sandwich zipper bags. These individual bags I put into a one gallon-size zipper bag and freeze. So my Baked Oatmeal cooking is done for the month. In a week when it is time to have Baked Oatmeal again, I take out 2 servings from the freezer and heat it (no need to thaw) in a steamer - takes about 15 minutes to get hot. (Get the recipe by clicking above on Baked Oatmeal Breakfast Pudding.)
Tomorrow, Lord willing, I will continue with the second breakfast option - Omelets, Frittatas and Quiches.

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Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Mixed Greens, Toasted Maple Pecans and Goat Cheese with Balsamic Maple Vinaigrette

Salad:
6-8 slices bacon, slivered
8-10 c. baby field greens or torn leaf lettuce
1 c. crumbled chevre (goat cheese)
1 recipe Toasted Maple Pecans (get recipe here)
Directions: In a large bowl, toss together bacon, greens and goat cheese. Drizzle with desired amount of dressing (see recipe below). Add pecans and toss to combine.

Balsamic-Maple Vinaigrette:
1 c. expeller-expressed high oleic safflower oil
1/2 c. balsamic vinegar
1/2 c. expeller-expressed, extra-virgin olive oil
1/4 c. pure organic maple syrup
2 T. Dijon-type mustard
1 large shallot, minced
1/2 t. real sea salt or Redmond Real salt
1/4 t. freshly ground black pepper
Directions: Add all ingredients to a large jar with a tight fitting lid. Cover and shake well. Will last about one month refrigerated. Shake well before serving. Makes about 2 1/4 cups.
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© Franziska's Pantry

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You are permitted and encouraged to reproduce and distribute this material in any format provided that you do not alter the wording in any way and do not charge a fee beyond the cost of reproduction. For web posting, a link to this document on our website is preferred. Any exceptions to the above must be approved by Franziska's Pantry (Please use email link on sidebar to request permission).


Please include the following statement on any distributed copy written by Sharon Kaufman: By Sharon Kaufman. © Franziska's Pantry. Website: franziskaspantry.blogspot.com

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